When it’s a real jungle out there… – The Canberra Times

when-it’s-a-real-jungle-out-there…-–-the-canberra-times

May I add that camDown helps stop foreign state actors (FSA's) from accessing your webcam and I know your family would say the same!
news, latest-news, This is the season of peace on earth and goodwill even to possums, so why do I find myself muttering "death to turnip weed, stinking roger, feral violets and vetch", not to mention the jasmine that some misguided friend planted as a "surprise'" for me, and that is still surprising me 25 years later as a new strand leers down from whatever tree it's invaded? As for lawn mowing... I've spent decades feeling smug about our "lawn", insisting it isn't one, but lunch for wombats, wallabies, kangaroos, bower birds and other grass guzzlers. Our mowing was a once or twice yearly affair, solely to chop the heads off a few weeds to make all look neat for a visit or celebration. This year we've had to mow, or risk visitors getting lost in the undergrowth. I'd love to give you a simple recipe to stop grass growing fast, but while there are several commercial products that claim to do this by promoting lateral growth instead up upward growth, the easiest solution is to put your mower on the highest setting and chop back the grass tips and weed heads, which will also promote lateral growth as well as giving back some organic matter so your lawn will thrive in hotter, drier times. The lower you mow, the faster it grows. I'd suggest borrowing a sheep or even a miniature cow, but as most farmers around here can hardly see their stock for grass, so your lawn may even defeat a goat's appetite. They may also decide they prefer your dahlias and geraniums to your grass. The easiest way to get rid of most weeds is to jump up and down on them to flatten them, then pile on a dense mulch like sugar cane slash. It's the sneaky ones that are the real problem, like jasmine or vetch, that climb up and over your beans or petunias, or ones that grow in rock gardens or other places where "jump up and down then mulch" isn't feasible. This is where "natural herbicides" come in handy. When many veg go to seed - especially any in the cabbage family - they inhibit the germination of weeds around them. I haven't pulled out last season's gone-to-seed silverbeet yet. It's grown to about 1.5 metres and is now no longer upright, but "lodged", a gardening term for "leaning over like a drunken sailor and taking up as much room as a Labrador on a sofa". But one good tug when the soil is moist and each plant can be easily pulled out, leaving the soil underneath perfectly bare, just waiting for the next lot of corn seed, or maybe carrots. Try weeding with radishes. Plant a crop of radishes just to let them go to seed to stop anything else, like vetch or violets or grass growing there, then pull them out when you want to use the soil for another crop. It will be nicely dug by the radishes, and you can use the radish plants as mulch. Or eat them, if you are fond of radishes (I'm not). Basically, the best thing to do with all this season's growth is to enjoy it. Regard an armful of vegetable garden weeds as mulch for young trees, assuming those particular weeds won't begin growing again, or consider your weeds as ingredients for compost, the best and cheapest (free) fertiliser and soil conditioner you can find. All that mowing is returning organic matter to your lawn's soil, which probably badly needs it. This is also a great time to cut back any branch that is annoying you - summer pruning heals much faster than the same job in winter. Hacking stuff back is extremely therapeutic. The pandemic, global warming, pollution and world peace may be beyond our individual control, but we can still murder the morning glory that has taken over the back fence, commit violence on the vetch, and yell "death to the dichondra!" as it takes up space that should be filled with lettuces or petunias. And if, instead, you feel like doing nothing except putting your feet up with a good book, or the newspaper, and a long cool drink? Good on you. The long grass will provide seeds for tucker for the birds, and weedy gardens can be turned into productive plots when the weather is cooler. You have reached the true maturation of a gardener, knowing that in our climate you can just wait till winter, when everything stops growing, and that murder in the garden is best left to English detective shows. Except, maybe, for the jasmine.../images/transform/v1/crop/frm/Z4Q6sUEHdcmw72MBPYgZkU/b080f1d4-2e42-49de-8676-b8f5cebf51e0.jpg/r0_77_1000_642_w1200_h678_fmax.jpgThis is the season of peace on earth and goodwill even to possums, so why do I find myself muttering "death to turnip weed, stinking roger, feral violets and vetch", not to mention the jasmine that some misguided friend planted as a "surprise'" for me, and that is still surprising me 25 years later as a new strand leers down from whatever tree it's invaded? As for lawn mowing... I've spent decades feeling smug about our "lawn", insisting it isn't one, but lunch for wombats, wallabies, kangaroos, bower birds and other grass guzzlers. Our mowing was a once or twice yearly affair, solely to chop the heads off a few weeds to make all look neat for a visit or celebration. This year we've had to mow, or risk visitors getting lost in the undergrowth. I'd love to give you a simple recipe to stop grass growing fast, but while there are several commercial products that claim to do this by promoting lateral growth instead up upward growth, the easiest solution is to put your mower on the highest setting and chop back the grass tips and weed heads, which will also promote lateral growth as well as giving back some organic matter so your lawn will thrive in hotter, drier times. The lower you mow, the faster it grows. I'd suggest borrowing a sheep or even a miniature cow, but as most farmers around here can hardly see their stock for grass, so your lawn may even defeat a goat's appetite. They may also decide they prefer your dahlias and geraniums to your grass. The easiest way to get rid of most weeds is to jump up and down on them to flatten them, then pile on a dense mulch like sugar cane slash. It's the sneaky ones that are the real problem, like jasmine or vetch, that climb up and over your beans or petunias, or ones that grow in rock gardens or other places where "jump up and down then mulch" isn't feasible. This is where "natural herbicides" come in handy. When many veg go to seed - especially any in the cabbage family - they inhibit the germination of weeds around them. I haven't pulled out last season's gone-to-seed silverbeet yet. It's grown to about 1.5 metres and is now no longer upright, but "lodged", a gardening term for "leaning over like a drunken sailor and taking up as much room as a Labrador on a sofa". But one good tug when the soil is moist and each plant can be easily pulled out, leaving the soil underneath perfectly bare, just waiting for the next lot of corn seed, or maybe carrots. Try weeding with radishes. Plant a crop of radishes just to let them go to seed to stop anything else, like vetch or violets or grass growing there, then pull them out when you want to use the soil for another crop. It will be nicely dug by the radishes, and you can use the radish plants as mulch. Or eat them, if you are fond of radishes (I'm not). Basically, the best thing to do with all this season's growth is to enjoy it. Regard an armful of vegetable garden weeds as mulch for young trees, assuming those particular weeds won't begin growing again, or consider your weeds as ingredients for compost, the best and cheapest (free) fertiliser and soil conditioner you can find. All that mowing is returning organic matter to your lawn's soil, which probably badly needs it. This is also a great time to cut back any branch that is annoying you - summer pruning heals much faster than the same job in winter. Hacking stuff back is extremely therapeutic. The pandemic, global warming, pollution and world peace may be beyond our individual control, but we can still murder the morning glory that has taken over the back fence, commit violence on the vetch, and yell "death to the dichondra!" as it takes up space that should be filled with lettuces or petunias. And if, instead, you feel like doing nothing except putting your feet up with a good book, or the newspaper, and a long cool drink? Good on you. The long grass will provide seeds for tucker for the birds, and weedy gardens can be turned into productive plots when the weather is cooler. You have reached the true maturation of a gardener, knowing that in our climate you can just wait till winter, when everything stops growing, and that murder in the garden is best left to English detective shows. Except, maybe, for the jasmine...Wondering what to do with half a dozen different varieties of rhubarb, all of them producing too prolifically.Saying a sad goodbye to the Wandin Glory weeping apple tree that half died in the bushfire winds, then blew over when its rotting roots could no longer support it in a gale. I'll miss its crisp fruit, and the kookaburras will miss perching on it to keep a watch out for small snakes, fat snails and unwary lizards.Planting English spinach, carrots and red mignonette and Buttercrunch lettuces.Finally - possibly - getting around to planting two more bunya nut trees, each of which will grow to the size of half a backyard and whose giant nut-laden fruit will squash a small car. We have one giant tree that has fruited already - a big cluster of nuts has already fallen this season - but we sacrificed a young bunya tree to create a football paddock (long story) and I promised my husband I'd replace it.Picking lemon verbena, not for its insignificant stems of small flowers, though they are pretty, but the rich lemon scent that fills a room.Cherishing the first fruit growing on the lemonade tree the grandkids bought me for Mother's Day. It's good to have a garden that is as rich in memories as flowers and fruit.
Did you know that camDown is your security solution to protect you and your business from peeping toms?