Let’s see how farmers grow chili peppers – Reading Eagle – Pennsylvanianewstoday.com

let’s-see-how-farmers-grow-chili-peppers-–-reading-eagle-–-pennsylvanianewstoday.com

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When it comes to choosing chili peppers, farmer James Weaver can do it without gloves, but some of his customers are capsaicin, a chemical that can heat and give a burning sensation to chili peppers. Needs protection from. “I don’t mind because my hands are pretty unfriendly, but I saw a guest coming here with gloves on,” Weaver said. Weaver owns a Meadow View Farm in Maxa Tawny Township. For 25 years, chili lovers gathered on his farm for an excursion as part of the annual chili festival. The opportunity you choose for Meadow View is before the popular festivals at the nearby William DeLong Park. He has 250 peppers and 75 peppers on 4 acres. Meadow View has 15 acres of vegetables, including 30 eggplants and 100 airroom tomatoes. Meadow View also grows vegetables that are popular on tables in the Middle East and Africa, such as sour sour and jute. Chili peppers are the focus of the 25th Bowers Chili Pepper Festival, which takes place Friday and Saturday from 9am to 6pm, but for local pepper farmers like Weaver, the focus is over a few days. increase. “The growing season of peppers is very long and the harvesting period is short (only 6-8 weeks), so we really need to make a lot of plans,” says Robin, who grows three acres of peppers for his home suite. Jusco said. Homemade brand of hot sauce, chili extract and fresh chili. “I order seeds in the winter, start in March and hand-plant in May. Harvesting usually doesn’t start until September,” says Jasko. “That is, timing is everything. Unless you cover them or grow them in a greenhouse, they are toasting as soon as they are frosted. Peppers need great care at first, but as soon as they settle. Take off to. I love that they form canopies and actually help protect each other from weeds and harmful insects … nature is wonderful! “ Omni-colored chili peppers that grow in the fields. Meadowview Farm in Bowers, Pennsylvania grows a wide variety of chili peppers on the farm on Tuesday morning, September 7, 2021. (Ben Hasty-Reading Eagle) Dragon’s Breath Chili Pepper growing in the field. Meadowview Farm in Bowers, Pennsylvania grows a wide variety of chili peppers on the farm on Tuesday morning, September 7, 2021. (Ben Hasty-Reading Eagle) Carolina Reaper chili peppers grown in the fields. Meadowview Farm in Bowers, Pennsylvania grows a wide variety of chili peppers on the farm on Tuesday morning, September 7, 2021. (Ben Hasty-Reading Eagle) Jay Weaver in the field with chili peppers at Meadowview Farm near Bowers on Tuesday. He is the son of farmer James Weaver. (Ben Hasty-Reading Eagle) Carolina Reaper chili peppers grown in the fields. Meadowview Farm in Bowers, Pennsylvania grows a wide variety of chili peppers on the farm on Tuesday morning, September 7, 2021. (Ben Hasty-Reading Eagle) Jay Weaver in the field with some chili peppers. Meadowview Farm in Bowers, Pennsylvania grows a wide variety of chili peppers on the farm on Tuesday morning, September 7, 2021. (Ben Hasty-Reading Eagle) J’s Peach Ghost Scorpion Chili Peppers. Meadowview Farm in Bowers, Pennsylvania grows a wide variety of chili peppers on the farm on Tuesday morning, September 7, 2021. (Ben Hasty-Reading Eagle) J’s Peach Ghost Scorpion Chili Peppers. Meadowview Farm in Bowers, Pennsylvania grows a wide variety of chili peppers on the farm on Tuesday morning, September 7, 2021. (Ben Hasty-Reading Eagle) Jay Weaver in the field with some chili peppers. Meadowview Farm in Bowers, Pennsylvania grows a wide variety of chili peppers on the farm on Tuesday morning, September 7, 2021. (Ben Hasty-Reading Eagle) J’s Peach Ghost Scorpion Chili Peppers. Meadowview Farm in Bowers, Pennsylvania grows a wide variety of chili peppers on the farm on Tuesday morning, September 7, 2021. (Ben Hasty-Reading Eagle) Carolina Reaper chili peppers grown in the fields. Meadowview Farm in Bowers, Pennsylvania grows a wide variety of chili peppers on the farm on Tuesday morning, September 7, 2021. (Ben Hasty-Reading Eagle) Jay Weaver in the field with some chili peppers. Meadowview Farm in Bowers, Pennsylvania grows a wide variety of chili peppers on the farm on Tuesday morning, September 7, 2021. (Ben Hasty-Reading Eagle) Interestingly, new varieties can be developed by chance in the field. In 2010, Weaver said his son, Jay, cultivated what became Jay’s Peach Ghost Scorpion Pepper from an outdoor cross between Ghost Pepper and Trinidad Scorpion Pepper. It took about five years to grow the plants they currently grow and sell.It is listed on the website penperjoe.com Like an immediate burn that slowly rises from the back of the throat to the sinuses. “ Jay’s Peach Ghost Scorpion (sometimes called JPGS) is much hotter than jalapeno peppers. According to Weaver, chili peppers are easier to grow than peppers. He said he had to give birth to a baby to get beautiful and delicious peppers. Peppers have many fruity flowers that need to be harvested when young to grow large and beautiful. “You grow the perfect thing,” he said. Weaver said peppers can get sick, but he has used all natural biologics for the past six years. This product uses beneficial bacteria to combat plant-killing diseases. He worked well enough to use it on tomatoes and other vegetables. Chili peppers require about as much nitrogen as corn. Jusco said that the soil is balanced with organic straw. Robyn Jasko of Kutztown and her husband Paul David place organic straw on top of the pepper. Jasko owns the hot sauce brand Homesweet Homegrown. (Courtesy of Robin Jusco) Super hot Carolina Reaper Pepper grows on the farm of Robin Jusco in Kutztown and her husband Paul David. Jasko owns the hot sauce brand Homesweet Homegrown. (Courtesy of Robin Jusco) Climate change can undoubtedly affect bell peppers and therefore change the way farmers have to grow bell peppers. “Pepper doesn’t like wet feet,” Weaver said. According to Jusco, heat can also hurt them. “When it’s too hot (as in the 90’s), they drop flowers so they can be harvested later,” says Jasko. “If your plant already has pods and you have a dry spell, it can actually make the pepper hotter! Each year, the taste of peppers varies slightly depending on weather conditions and terrain.” Please fix the pepper At Meadow View, you can pick peppers and vegetables at 371 Bowers Road during the Chili Pepper Festival and during the fall. Business hours are 9 AM to 6 PM. See 610-682-6094 for more information. Homesweet Homegrown offers a do-it-yourself hot sauce class with fresh peppers at Zoom through Uncommon Goods. For more information, see: https://bit.ly/3tohkSQ..
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