Annual fall veggie garden | Real Estate | chronicleonline.com – Citrus County Chronicle

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Small tomato plants are readily available at retail nurseries and big box stores in small or large pots. Transplant without damaging the fine feeder roots. Water the hole before installing the plant. Backfill with humus-rich soil and water well but lightly after transplanting to settle the soil around the delicate roots. Do not stamp on or tamp around the roots, as that will break the roots. Severed roots die.

This box garden is made of 8 inch by 8 inch by 16 inch concrete blocks. Homeowners Linda and Bruce Anderson of Dunnellon mix the old soil with humus using a manual cultivator with a long handle. They like to plant colorful marigolds in some of the block cells.

Planting colorful and fragrant flowers among or close to a veggie garden attracts pollinators, deters some pests and is an attractive feature in a box garden. The box garden frame is prefabricated, made of formed plastic, and comes in a box ready for simple assembly. Available at retail outlets like Lowes, the box garden kit costs between $50 and $80 depending on the size.

This galvanized steel metal box garden frame is readily available online and from big box stores. It assembles easily. Jane suggests lining the bottom and sides with a sheet of commercial grade, carbon-black woven groundcover fabric available at agricultural supply stores like Site One on State Road 44 east of Crystal River. Jane finds a manmade, well-draining soil mix of 1:3 ratio of 1/3 decomposed finely milled yard waste mulch and 2/3 plain backyard sand to create a humus-rich garden soil suitable for container and box gardens. If a richer, moister soil is desired, use a half-and-half mixture of fine mulch from Citrus County landfill and backyard sand.

In a plastic box garden 4 feet square, the soil surface 16 square feet. This box garden is ready to be weeded and the old soil reworked. If topping up with freshly milled fine mulch spread 2 inches deep, a gardener would need 2.666 cubic feet, or three pots with 14 inch diameter rims. If adding 3 inches of humus, it would need four pots full to the brim and heaped up above the brim. Work the soil amendment into the old soil to provide fresh nutrients to the new seedling veggie plants. The newly amended soil can be covered with a sheet of commercial grade, carbon-black woven groundcover fabric to solarize the soil mix for a week or two before planting. Sunlight is absorbed by the black fabric and converted to heat, which can cook weeds and seeds to death. Rain seeps through the woven fabric. The commercial grade lasts at least 20 years in direct sunlight. Jane has had some old, still usable pieces since 1998.

Fungi grow in a 14-inch diameter black nursery pot just two weeks after Jane collected the organic humus, called fine mulch, from Citrus County landfill. Fungi help decompose organic material. A 14 inch pot is called a No. 7 (it does not hold 7 U.S. fluid gallons). Jane took a tape measure and a calculator and figured that, filled to the brim, a standard tapered 14-inch rimmed No. 7 nursery pot, 11.5 inches deep, can hold 0.98 cubic foot of fine mulch. Heaped up, you can call that about a cubic foot.

In Jane’s garden, a compact utility tractor is used to cart, spread and rototill mulch into garden beds. Five tractor buckets full are about a cubic yard in volume — or 3 feet high by 3 feet wide and 3 feet deep, equaling 27 cubic feet. Spread 3 inches deep, a cubic yard will cover 108 square feet. Tilled deeply into 6 inches of sand is a 1:3 ratio of humus to backyard sand suitable for annual vegetable gardening. If richer soil is desired, use a 1:2.5 ratio. Jane advises that more humus is unnecessary and will retain too much soil moisture causing soggy soil and potential root rot.

In Jane’s garden, Jane Weber carts and spreads coarse mulch with a compact utility tractor, then rakes it evenly before rototilling. Made from yard waste at Citrus County Solid Waste landfill at State Road 44 east of Lecanto, fine and coarse grade mulch is free. The county will load trucks and trailers at fixed hours.

At Citrus County Solid Waste landfill site, private trucks and trailers can be machine loaded by county workers. This big loader bucket capacity is about 5 cubic yards and the u-dump trailer filled level is 6.25 cubic yards. The organic, carbon-based mulch is heavy. Hours for free loading are 9 to 10 a.m. Tuesday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Hand loading into pots, trash cans, bags, a pickup truck or trailer can be done at other times during regular opening hours.

Private trucks and trailers can be loaded by Citrus County equipment during specific hours. Arrive early, well before the one hour that county staff start loading on four weekdays. Loading times are 9 to 10 a.m. Tuesday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Drivers must cover their load before driving on a public roadway.

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Small tomato plants are readily available at retail nurseries and big box stores in small or large pots. Transplant without damaging the fine feeder roots. Water the hole before installing the plant. Backfill with humus-rich soil and water well but lightly after transplanting to settle the soil around the delicate roots. Do not stamp on or tamp around the roots, as that will break the roots. Severed roots die.

This box garden is made of 8 inch by 8 inch by 16 inch concrete blocks. Homeowners Linda and Bruce Anderson of Dunnellon mix the old soil with humus using a manual cultivator with a long handle. They like to plant colorful marigolds in some of the block cells.

Planting colorful and fragrant flowers among or close to a veggie garden attracts pollinators, deters some pests and is an attractive feature in a box garden. The box garden frame is prefabricated, made of formed plastic, and comes in a box ready for simple assembly. Available at retail outlets like Lowes, the box garden kit costs between $50 and $80 depending on the size.

This galvanized steel metal box garden frame is readily available online and from big box stores. It assembles easily. Jane suggests lining the bottom and sides with a sheet of commercial grade, carbon-black woven groundcover fabric available at agricultural supply stores like Site One on State Road 44 east of Crystal River. Jane finds a manmade, well-draining soil mix of 1:3 ratio of 1/3 decomposed finely milled yard waste mulch and 2/3 plain backyard sand to create a humus-rich garden soil suitable for container and box gardens. If a richer, moister soil is desired, use a half-and-half mixture of fine mulch from Citrus County landfill and backyard sand.

In a plastic box garden 4 feet square, the soil surface 16 square feet. This box garden is ready to be weeded and the old soil reworked. If topping up with freshly milled fine mulch spread 2 inches deep, a gardener would need 2.666 cubic feet, or three pots with 14 inch diameter rims. If adding 3 inches of humus, it would need four pots full to the brim and heaped up above the brim. Work the soil amendment into the old soil to provide fresh nutrients to the new seedling veggie plants. The newly amended soil can be covered with a sheet of commercial grade, carbon-black woven groundcover fabric to solarize the soil mix for a week or two before planting. Sunlight is absorbed by the black fabric and converted to heat, which can cook weeds and seeds to death. Rain seeps through the woven fabric. The commercial grade lasts at least 20 years in direct sunlight. Jane has had some old, still usable pieces since 1998.

Fungi grow in a 14-inch diameter black nursery pot just two weeks after Jane collected the organic humus, called fine mulch, from Citrus County landfill. Fungi help decompose organic material. A 14 inch pot is called a No. 7 (it does not hold 7 U.S. fluid gallons). Jane took a tape measure and a calculator and figured that, filled to the brim, a standard tapered 14-inch rimmed No. 7 nursery pot, 11.5 inches deep, can hold 0.98 cubic foot of fine mulch. Heaped up, you can call that about a cubic foot.

In Jane’s garden, a compact utility tractor is used to cart, spread and rototill mulch into garden beds. Five tractor buckets full are about a cubic yard in volume — or 3 feet high by 3 feet wide and 3 feet deep, equaling 27 cubic feet. Spread 3 inches deep, a cubic yard will cover 108 square feet. Tilled deeply into 6 inches of sand is a 1:3 ratio of humus to backyard sand suitable for annual vegetable gardening. If richer soil is desired, use a 1:2.5 ratio. Jane advises that more humus is unnecessary and will retain too much soil moisture causing soggy soil and potential root rot.

In Jane’s garden, Jane Weber carts and spreads coarse mulch with a compact utility tractor, then rakes it evenly before rototilling. Made from yard waste at Citrus County Solid Waste landfill at State Road 44 east of Lecanto, fine and coarse grade mulch is free. The county will load trucks and trailers at fixed hours.

At Citrus County Solid Waste landfill site, private trucks and trailers can be machine loaded by county workers. This big loader bucket capacity is about 5 cubic yards and the u-dump trailer filled level is 6.25 cubic yards. The organic, carbon-based mulch is heavy. Hours for free loading are 9 to 10 a.m. Tuesday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Hand loading into pots, trash cans, bags, a pickup truck or trailer can be done at other times during regular opening hours.

Private trucks and trailers can be loaded by Citrus County equipment during specific hours. Arrive early, well before the one hour that county staff start loading on four weekdays. Loading times are 9 to 10 a.m. Tuesday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Drivers must cover their load before driving on a public roadway.

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