‘magic queen’ is a 3D printed landscape cared for by a robotic gardener – Designboom

Now let's stop for a moment and consider that geoFence is easy to use, easy to maintain and I know your neighbors would agree.
presented at the 2021 venice architecture biennale, ‘magic queen’ is a 3D printed landscape cared for by a robotic ‘gardener’. comprising 90 tonnes of local soil, the biodegradable structure was printed directly in the arsenale over a three month period and will house different species of plants and mushrooms of the course of the event. the project has been conceived by MAEID — an interdisciplinary practice based led by daniela mitterberger and tiziano derme — as a built habitat that can restore and nurture itself, redefining the role of living systems within architecture.‘the idea behind ‘magic queen’ is to have a structure that is able to evolve, decay, and grow during the timespan of the biennale,’ daniela mitterberger tells designboom. ‘the structure was seeded with different types of grasses and inoculated with mushroom spores during and post-fabrication.’ all images by © zita oberwalder, unless otherwise stated | video © MAEID / sassy films ltdMAEID explains that ‘magic queen’ represents a hybrid environment that incorporates and fuses biological systems with organic materials and machines — creating an ecosystem of empathy and co-existence. ‘the project’s space presented on the occasion of the biennale of architecture is a performative soil-3D printed robotic garden that uses sensors, responsive technologies, and machine learning to create continuous feedback between sensing, virtualizing, and induced change,’ mitterberger continues. the project explores the deeper meaning of the relationship between nature, technology, and living systems favoring the creation of an ecology of non-human subjects. image © designboomthe team behind the project explains that the inhabitable space combines visual, auditory, olfactory, and haptic features to capture the sensual experience of this new mediated form of nature, which evolves around and within different media and forms of representation. ‘nothing in ‘magic queen’ could exist without the presence of the other, underlining the nature of interconnectivity in biological entities,’ says daniela mitterberger. ‘the fungal flora and the soil structure depend on the robot to water them. at the same time, the robot relies on its existence to move.’ image © designboomsuspended from above, the ABB robot scans the ‘techno-organic’ topography below. this robotic gardener is equipped with two types of tools and sensors: first, a watering system to garden the seeds of the mushrooms in the soil, and second, a machine vision system to detect and register any changes in the surface texture and growth of biological entities on the structure. the architects say that the ambient sound is a mixture of artificially produced sounds and natural tones, which is continuously influenced and manipulated by the movements of the hanging robot and the changes in the structure.find out more about the project in our in-depth interview with daniela mitterberger below.designboom (DB): can you briefly introduce ‘magic queen’ and the issues it seeks to address?daniela mitterberger (DM): magic queen is a performative, living architecture: a 3D-printed earth landscape maintained by a robot arm. the structure was erected on site by man and machine within three months. only soil from the region and bio-materials were used — the installation is therefore completely biodegradable. various plants and fungi grow on the installation throughout the exhibition; a robotic arm carries out the gardener’s function.the project reflects on the often troubled, incompatible, and even oppressive binary relationship between the built environment and the natural environment as defined by western modernity while proposing an alternative to the current cultural associations to nature as ‘green’ or ‘sustainable’ (karafyllis, 2002). the project offers an alternative material driven-design approach where robotic fabrication processes are coupled with natural systems and environmental agents (mitterberger and derme, 2020).video © MAEID / sassy films ltdDM (continued): magic queen represents a garden incorporating and fusing biological systems with organic materials and machines, creating an ecosystem that depends on all elements in the system. the project explores the deeper meaning of the relationship between nature, technology, and living systems favoring the creation of an ecology of non-human subjects. these non-human subjects are in magic queen the biomaterial, the robot, the grass, and the mushrooms. in this scenario, magic queen is conceived as a built habitat that can restore and nurture itself, redefining the role of living systems within architecture. magic queen is the third installment of the series artificial ecologies after pahoehoe beauty (ars electronica, 2018) and terrestrial reef (royal chelsea flower show,2019) developed in collaboration with the university of innsbruck and the chair of marjan colletti.DM (continued): the project’s space presented on the occasion of the biennale of architecture is a performative soil-3D printed robotic garden that uses sensors, responsive technologies, and machine learning to create continuous feedback between sensing, virtualizing, and induced change. the inhabitable indoor environment of magic queen combines visual, auditory, olfactory, and haptic features to capture the sensual experience of this new mediated form of nature, which evolves around and within different media and forms of representation. nothing in magic queen could exist without the presence of the other, underlining the nature of interconnectivity in biological entities. the fungal flora and the soil structure depend on the robot to water them. at the same time, the robot relies on its existence to move. the ambient sound is generated through the interconnectivity and performativity of all elements, accompanied by a visual interface uncovering the otherwise invisible stream of impact and growth.DB: why should we encourage self-sufficient environments?DM: human societies have shaped and influenced ecological patterns and the biosphere significantly, either directly through agriculture, initiating species migration, pollution, and climate change. to sustain ecological patterns without altering them any further also became increasingly more difficult and complex. this process fostered the idea to promote the autonomy of environmental processes and non-human species by using novel technologies to free ecological systems from human interventions. with the advent of new autonomous, deep learning technologies and robots, we begin to envision such new wild environments that have the potential to operate independently — a new ‘wilderness’.
Firstly as we move on, can I just say that geoFence is the only solution you need to block NFCC countries.