AgweekTV Full Show: Planting progress, CBD extraction, soil health and salinity – AG Week

agweektv-full-show:-planting-progress,-cbd-extraction,-soil-health-and-salinity-–-ag-week

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Planting is progressing at a near record pace in Iowa. We'll also check in on how planting is going in Minnesota and the Dakotas. A company has added new equipment which will add more value to a new crop. On the Soil Health Minute, we'll get answers on how to manage those saline areas that keep robbing you of your yield.

u0009WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M MICHELLE ROOK. FARMERS HAVE MADE HUGE PLANTING PROGRESS IN THE REGION THE LAST TWO WEEKS. u0009IOWA WAS THE LEADER LAST WEEK, PLANTING 50-PERCENT OF THE CORN ACRES AND MINNESOTA AND NEBRASKA WEREN'T FAR BEHIND. ALL THE STATES IN THE REGION ARE AHEAD OF NORMAL.

IOWA FARMERS ALSO PLANTED NEARLY 37-PERCENT OF THEIR SOYBEANS LAST WEEK, WITH NEBRASKA 17-PERCENT. AND MINNESOTA LEAD ON SPRING WHEAT PLANTING, WITH 53-PERCENT OF THE CROP SEEDED IN ONE WEEK. THEY'RE NOW AT 72 PERCENT DONE. SOUTH DAKOTA IS ALSO WELL AHEAD OF AVERAGE AT 81-PERCENT.

u0009WITH THE WEATHER FINALLY COOPERATING PLANTING HAS BEEN RUNNING CLOSE TO LAST YEAR'S NEAR RECORD PACE. I CAUGHT UP WITH FARMERS IN IOWA AND SOUTH DAKOTA THAT WERE TAKING ADVANTAGE OF THE GREAT PLANTING WINDOW. Rock Rapids farmer Dean Meyer can't recall a year he was able to finish this fast. Dean Meyer, Rock Rapids, Iowa farmer, "This year's been amazing. You know we all were worried about it being cold and not getting to the field and it's just like a switch. The weather changed and we got our corn all in in seven days."

Meyers says some farmers are planting soybeans at the same time or before corn with the ideal conditions and didn't have to go around potholes. Meyer, "Planting conditions couldn't have been better this year. Every square foot of the farms got farmed." Nat sound pop "Another one done," An hour south Dave Heeren is finishing up a successful planting season. Heeren, '"I would say it's a record pace as far as getting it done because we have all day to work and everything's working so well. He planted in a cloud of dust and two inches deep so the seed would hit moisture. But he says it's too early to get concerned about drought especially with today's genetics. Heeren, "A few timely rains and we'll be alright. I've seen this before and we've come out of it alright" His planting scheme was routine, except one corn on corn field he decided to plant beans with the high price of fertilizer. Heeren, "Plus soybeans are such a cheaper crop to put in and $15 soybeans are a pretty good ticket." In northeast South Dakota, Chad Schooley was planting corn , while the hired man was planting soybeans. "I can't remember planting going this fast and field conditions being this good," he says. Unlike much of South Dakota, there's good moisture to start the crops. Castlewood area is one of the few places in the state that isn't lit up with some drought, but we're not far from it. Schooley got inputs locked in early and with higher grain prices he's feeling good to start the season. Schooley, "This is the first time since probably 2012 that with our guarantees we're going to the field with a profit locked in for next fall." As part of that he's also started to scale up sell his new crop to take advantage of this rare opportunity. u0009MINNESOTA FARMERS ALSO PLANTED 42-PERCENT OF THE CORN AND 21-PERCENT OF THE SOYBEAN CROP IN THE WEEK ENDING MAY 2, AND MADE EVEN MORE PROGRESS THIS WEEK. u0009IN THE SOUTHEAST PART OF THE STATE, NEAR ROCHESTER, TOM PYFFEROEN AND HIS SON, AARON,GOT STARTED PLANTING ON APRIL 27TH. TOM SAYS THEY HAVEN'T HAD MUCH RAIN IN HIS AREA OVER THE LAST MONTH, SO THE GROUND IS GETTING FAIRLY DRY, BUT THEY'RE STILL PLANTING INTO GOOD MOISTURE. SO HE'S NOT CONCERNED ABOUT THE DRY CONDITIONS YET. Tom: I do like it a little bit dry when you're planting because you have a tendency to get a better root system, under corn and soybeans, where the roots go down instead of spread out. And if you get dry weather later on in the season, I believe it makes a big difference. u0009PYFFEROEN IS USING PRACTICES LIKE COVER CROPS AND NO-TILL TO HELP CONSERVE VALUABLE SOIL MOISTURE, ESPECIALLY IF IT STAYS DRY THROUGH THE SEASON. u0009ALTHOUGH MANY AREAS OF THE NORTHERN PLAINS ARE FACING DROUGHT LIKE CONDITIONS THIS PLANTING SEASON, IN COLFAX, NORTH DAKOTA, u0009PRODUCERS LIKE JAY MYERS HAVE PLENTY OF SUBSOIL MOISTURE TO SPARE, AS IT'S BEEN THE WETTEST PART OF THE STATE FOR THE PAST YEAR. u0009DESPITE A DRY 2020 HARVEST, AND ONE OF THE DRIEST SPRINGS IN A WHILE, HE SAYS SUBSOIL MOISTURE HAS THEM SET UP WELL FOR PLANTING. u0009IT'S ONLY THE TEMPS THAT'VE BEEN HOLDING THEM BACK. Jay: This year has just been a little bit colder, so we've been a little more cautious just getting started because of the cold weather. The soil temperatures are a little bit colder than normal, but that could change pretty fast in another week if we start to get some heat you know. u0009EVEN WITH THE DELAY, MYERS EXPECTS TO HAVE ALL HIS CORN AND SOYBEANS PLANTED BY THE MIDDLE OF MAY. u0009MORE THAN $13.5 BILLION HAS BEEN PAID OUT TO FARMERS THROUGH THE CFAP 2.0 PROGRAM. u0009IOWA TOPS THE REGION AT $1.2 BILLION GOING TO MORE THAN 61,000 APPLICANTS, NEBRASKA FOLLOWED WITH PAYMENTS OF $849 MILLION. IN MINNESOTA, NEARLY 38,000 APPLICATIONS HAVE BEEN APPROVED TOTALING $822 MILLION, SOUTH DAKOTA FARMERS HAVE RECEIVED MORE THAN $554 MILLION AND NORTH DAKOTA OPERATIONS NEARLY $481 MILLION. u0009MEMBERS OF THE SENATE AG COMMITTEE MET WITH AG SECRETARY TOM VILSACK LAST WEEK. VILSACK GAVE AN UPDATE ON THE QUALITY LOSS ADJUSTMENT PAYMENT DEADLINE. HE'S LOOKING AT GETTING THE PROGRAM OUT BY THE FIRST PART OF MAY. u0009A SECOND DISCRIMINATION LAWSUIT WAS FILED AGAINST USDA LAST WEEK. u0009THIS TIME IT WAS FILED BY THE WISCONSIN INSTITUTE FOR LAW AND LIBERTY IN A WISCONSIN FEDERAL COURT. FIVE WHITE FARMERS FROM WISCONSIN, MINNESOTA, SOUTH DAKOTA AND OHIO CLAIM THE RECENT $4 BILLION IN DEBT FORGIVENESS FOR FARMERS OF COLOR IS UNCONSTITUTIONAL. u0009FARM GROUPS WANT PRESIDENT BIDEN TO CLARIFY THE TAX PROVISIONS HE PROPOSED TO HELP PAY FOR HIS $1.8 TRILLION AMERICAN FAMILIES PLAN. u0009OF GREATEST CONCERN ARE CHANGES TO CAPITAL GAINS TAXES, STEPPED UP BASIS AND LIKE KIND EXCHANGES. THE PRESIDENT SAYS THE PLAN WOULD PUT A $1 MILLION CAP ON ASSETS THAT COULD RECEIVE STEPPED-UP BASIS, BUT FAMILY BUSINESSES LIKE FARMS WOULD BE EXEMPTED AS LONG AS THE HEIRS DO NOT SELL THAT ASSET. HOWEVER, DETAILS OF THE PLAN ARE STILL SKETCHY AND SO FARMERS ARE FEARFUL. I feel that if he gets into where we're going to inhibit of passing from one generation of the farm to the next, its going to be a detriment of middle America. u0009THE PLAN ALSO LIMITS SECTION 1031 REAL ESTATE EXCHANGES TO $500,000....PLUS DOUBLES LONG-TERM CAPITAL GAINS TAXES TO 43.4-PERCENT ON HOUSEHOLDS MAKING OVER $1 MILLION. UP NEXT, GROWING HEMP FOR CBD IS INCREASING IN POPULARITY. u0009CBD IS A TYPE OF CANNABINOID. THESE ARE CHEMICALS NATURALLY FOUND IN MARIJUANA PLANTS., BUT CBD OIL PRODUCERS AND PROCESSORS MUST KEEP THE "THC" LEVELS LOW ENOUGH SO IT DOESN'T CREATE A "HIGH," OR INTOXICATION. u0009MIKKEL PATES HAS MORE ON AN ORGANIC CBD OIL EXTRACTING COMPANY THAT IS INVESTING IN NEW EQUIPMENT THAT MAY HELP WITH THIS CHALLENGE. MIKKEL: BECCA DUFNER AND HER HUSBAND JOE ARE ORGANIC FARMERS ON 2000 ACRES IN NORTHEAST NORTH DAKOTA. Becca Dufner: WE HAVE ORGANIC GRAINS AND EDIBLE BEANS, SUCH AS, WE DO A LOT OF OATS, ORGANIC OATS. AND OUR BEANS ARE DARK RED KIDNEYS, BLACK BEANS, PINTO BEANS, WHITE KIDNEY BEANS. MIKKEL: AFTER CONGRESS LEGALIZED GROWING INDUSTRIAL HEMP IN 2018, THE DUFNERS TRIED GROWING HEMP FOR CBD OIL. Becca Dufner: WE WANTED TO HAVE A CERTIFIED ORGANIC CBD HEMP. THAT WAS REALLY IMPORTANT TO US, TO MAKE SURE THAT WE HAVE A PLANT THAT IS ALL NATURAL AND FREE OF SOLVENTS AND FREE OF CHEMICALS. MIKKEL: BAD WEATHER COST THEM THEIR FIRST CROP IN 2019. WHILE THEY HAVE HOPES OF PRODUCING THE CROP AGAIN, THEY, AND TWO PARTNERS, HAVE STARTED 1881 EXTRACTION COMPANY -- A CBD PROCESSING BUSINESS THAT IS CERTIFIED FOR THE ORGANIC MARKET. Becca Dufner: WE WANTED TO MAKE SURE WE HAD FULL TRACEABILITY, AND EVERYTHING IS SOLVENT FREE AND CHEMICAL FREE, SO IT'S VERY HEALTHY FOR YOUR BODY. Mikkel Pates standup on cam: ONE OF THE BIG PROBLEMS WITH GROWING HEMP FOR CBD OIL IS THC CONTENT. Becca Dufner: IF YOU'RE NOT FAMILIAR WITH THC, IT'S THE ILLEGAL PART OF THIS PLANT. WE HAVE TO BE WITHIN REGULATION AND GUIDELINES. MIKKEL: THE DUFNERS ARE FIGURING OUT A THC "REMITIGATION" PROCESS FOR CONTROLLING THC INSIDE THEIR CBD PROCESSING. SOMEDAY THAT MIGHT BE GOOD NEWS FOR PRODUCERS. Becca Dufner: IT'S HUGE. WE'RE SO EXCITED. THERE'S NOBODY ELSE DOING IT THAT I'M AWARE OF. ESPECIALLY ORGANIC. MIKKEL: DUFNER SAYS THEIR NEW EQUIPMENT SHOULD BE HERE IN THE NEXT FEW WEEKS. HEMP PRODUCERS ARE STILL RESPONSIBLE FOR MAKING SURE THEIR HEMP DOESN'T EXCEED THC LIMITS IN THE FIELD, AND CANNOT HARVEST IT OR SHIP IT OFF THE FARM IF IT DOES -- EVEN WITHIN THE STATE TO A PROCESSOR. IN CASE YOU'RE WONDERING, THE COMPANY'S NAME, 1881, IS A NOD TO THE YEAR ITS HOMETOWN WAS FOUNDED. AT HILLSBORO, N.D., THIS IS MIKKEL PATES FOR AGWEEK. u0009THE 9TH CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS ISSUED A RULING AGAINST THE USE OF THE INSECTICIDE CHLORPYRIFOS OR LORSBAN. u0009THE RULING SAYS THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY HAS 60 DAYS TO DETERMINE IF IT IS SAFE OR IT MUST BE BANNED. THE SAN-FRANCISCO BASED COURT MADE THE RULING WITH A TWO TO ONE DECISION. CORTEVA SAID LAST YEAR IT WOULD STOP PRODUCING THE INSECTICIDE BY THE END OF 2020 DUE TO DECLINING SALES. u0009 LEGISLATION HAS BEEN INTRODUCED TO PREVENT EPA FROM ISSUING PERMITS FOR LIVESTOCK EMISSIONS. SENATE AG COMMITTEE MEMBER JOHN THUNE SAYS FARMERS SHOULD NOT BE SUBJECT TO ONEROUS REGULATIONS AND COSTLY PERMIT FEES FOR THEIR ANIMAL'S C02 EMISSIONS. u0009USDA HAS NOTIFIED PORK PROCESSORS THEY NEED TO SLOW DOWN LINE SPEEDS. u0009AS A RESULT OF A RECENT COURT RULING, PORK PLANTS CAN SLAUGHTER NO MORE THAN 1,106 HOG PER HOUR. LABOR UNIONS AND WORKERS WELCOMED THE NEWS, ARGUING THE FASTER SPEEDS JEOPARDIZE EMPLOYEE AND FOOD SAFETY. WHILE INDUSTRY OFFICIALS HAVE WARNED IT COULD DISRUPT FARMERS AND SOME OF THE INDUSTRY'S BIGGEST PROCESSING PLANTS. DON'T GO ANYWHERE. THERE'S MORE AGWEEKTV STRAIGHT AHEAD... Coming up on the Soil Health Minute, now is the time to start managing those saline areas in your field. AND LATER...INTEREST IN PLANT BASED FOODS CONTINUES TO GROW... u0009IT WAS A COOL DRY WEEK IN THE REGION, AND WHILE THAT ALLOWED PLANTING TO PROGRESS THE CROP WILL NEED RAIN AS IT EMERGES. IS THERE ANY IN THE FORECAST? u0009HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK. THE AGWEEK SOIL HEALTH MINUTE IS SPONSORED BY THE NORTH DAKOTA CORN COUNCIL u0009IN THIS MONTH'S EPISODE OF THE SOIL HEALTH MINUTE, ABBEY WICK GETS ANSWERS TO SOME QUESTIONS ABOUT SALINITY IN FIELDS, SOMETHING THAT'S MORE NOTICEABLE THIS SPRING WITH THE DRY WEATHER IN THE NORTHERN PLAINS. Abbey: As farmers are getting back in their fields this spring, I'm starting to get questions about some of those saline areas and how to best manage them. So I went right to Dr. Tom DeSutter, a soil scientist here at NDSU, to get some of those answers. Tom: One of the things we, seems to be year after year, is how do we manage salts? One of the first things we always tell people is to manage the water. If you understand how the water moves in the soil, it's the first step in understanding how to manage salts. The second thing is to plant a crop that is tolerant to those conditions. So if you do have a large area in your field, and you're planting a salt sensitive crop, that may not be the best option for that saline area. Abbey: With these saline areas, can we ignore them or do we need to actively manage them? Tom: These areas should be managed because of the fact that, and the best way to do that, is to keep a cover on them, to keep evaporation down. Water will want to move to where it's the most dry. And the most dry is where it's tilled and dark and where it absorbs a lot of heat. So that's where the water's going to evaporate, that's where the water is going to move. When the water moves, the water evaporates, the salts stay behind. So therefore if you keep a cover on that soil the best you can, that'll keep evaporation down and that'll keep the water from wanting to evaporate. Abbey: If you're looking for more information on how to manage salinity, you can always go to the NDSU Soil Health webpage. u0009A NEW STUDY SHOWS SIGNIFICANT HEALTH BENEFITS FROM USING 100-PERCENT BIODIESEL, INCLUDING DECREASED CANCER RISK, FEWER PREMATURE DEATHS AND REDUCED ASTHMA ATTACKS. u0009IN FACT, IT SHOWED A 45-PERCENT REDUCTION IN CANCER RISK WHEN USED IN TRUCKS AND 86-PERCENT WHEN USED FOR HOME HEATING OIL, PLUS OVER 200,000 LESS ASTHMA ATTACKS. TRINITY CONSULTANTS CONDUCTED THE RESEARCH AT 13 SITES IN THE U.S. WITH EXPOSURE TO HIGH RATES OF PETROLEUM POLLUTION. IT ALSO INDICATED B100 USE RESULTS IN 46,000 FEWER SICK DAYS ANNUALLY. THIS AVOIDS $3 BILLION IN HEALTH COSTS LARGELY DUE TO LOWER PARTICULATE MATTER EMISSIONS. If the trucks are using biodiesel in that high traffic area they're going to eliminate a lot of that health issues there for sick days for the people that work around there. The health benefits of not getting asthma there. u0009THE STUDY WAS FUNDED IN PART BY THE SOYBEAN COUNCILS IN SOUTH DAKOTA, IOWA AND NEBRASKA AND SHOWS WHAT FARMERS HAVE LONG KNOWN...BIODIESEL OFFERS A BETTER AND CLEANER ALTERNATIVE TO PETROLEUM DIESEL. STILL AHEAD, A MINNESOTA WOMAN'S PLAN TO HELP DEAL WITH THE GROWING PROBLEM OF FOOD WASTE AND FOOD INSECURITY. u0009A NEW STUDY FINDS THE PANDEMIC HAS PUSHED UP ALREADY RISING DEMAND FOR PLANT BASED FOODS. u0009U.S. RETAIL SALES GREW 27-PERCENT LAST YEAR, ACCORDING TO AN ANNUAL SURVEY BY THE PLANT BASED FOODS ASSOCIATION AND THE GOOD FOODS INSTITUTE. u0009THE SURVEY FOUND 57-PERCENT OF ALL U.S. HOUSEHOLDS BOUGHT PLANT BASED FOODS IN 2020, UP 4-PERCENT FROM THE PREVIOUS YEAR. u0009THE LARGEST CATEGORY WAS PLANT BASED BEVERAGES ACCOUNTING FOR 35-PERCENT OF THE MARKET, WHICH SAW A 20-PERCENT GROWTH IN SALES, u0009PLANT BASED MEAT IS NOW 8-PERCENT OF THE MARKET AND SALES ROSE 45-PERCENT FROM 2019. u0009FARMERS MARKETS ARE OPENING AGAIN. ROCHESTER'S MOVED TO A NEW LOCATION LAST YEAR, AS PART OF THE REVITALIZATION OF GRAHAM PARK PROJECT. BUT DIDN'T CELEBRATE IT DUE TO THE PANDEMIC. u0009THEY "OFFICIALLY" WELCOMED THE COMMUNITY TO THEIR NEW LOCATION EARLY THIS MONTH, WHICH INCLUDES A NEW GREEN SPACE FOR PICNICING, AND LISTENING TO MUSIC, AND MANY NEW VENDORS. u0009LISA SCHUTZ WORKS WITH SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM. SHE SAYS WITH THE PANDEMIC, FOOD INSECURITY AND FOOD WASTE BOTH INCREASED, SO SHE DEVISED A PROGRAM TO HELP. Lisa: So when farmers leave here, they have a whole lot of food they don't know what to do with, never mind what's in the field. We know, last season, two metric tons of squash left this county because we didn't have a means to process it. So we had food insecure folks here and squash going up the road to the Cities. So this is what inspired us to do the work that we're doing u0009THE PROGRAM FORMED A PARTNERSHIP WITH INFUSION FOODS. THEY DEVELOPED A PRODUCT LINE FROM RESCUED FOOD WHICH WILL BE AVAILABLE THIS SEASON, AS WELL AS DISTRIBUTED DIRECTLY TO THOSE IN NEED. THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV. REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM, AND FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM AS WELL. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.
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