Walter’s Viburnum | Home and Outdoor Living | chronicleonline.com – Citrus County Chronicle

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At Dunnellon Public Library, this Walter’s Viburnum, Viburnum obovatum, is a selected named variety called ‘Densa.’ It was planted about seven years ago and pruned to prevent it from growing to its maximum height of about 5 feet tall.

The small flowering tree with white spring flowers is a native semi-deciduous Walter’s Viburnum. It grows alongside Citrus Avenue at low elevation a few miles north of Crystal River. The roadside is lined with natural native trees and shrubs including Sabal Palm, Sabal palmetto, Florida’s state tree, Longleaf Pines, Pinus palustris, and deciduous Turkey Oak, Quercus laevis. Walter’s Viburnum ranges on the temperate Southeastern Coastal Plain from Alabama through Georgia and into South Carolina in U.S. cold hardiness zones 6 to 9. It is slow growing, with a lifespan of about 50 years.

This white flowering Walter’s Viburnum grows on the west side of Citrus Avenue north of Crystal River. It flowers for about three weeks in early March. Native, natural Walter’s Viburnum is a semi-deciduous shrub to small tree that grows to 30 feet tall in the wild. Its habitats include coastal hammocks, limestone outcrops, floodplains, woods and riverbanks. It ranges throughout Florida and may be evergreen in the south but is deciduous where winters have frosts and freezes.

Named varieties of Walter’s Viburnum remain compact, dense and much shorter than the original species, so are popular in commercial landscapes and home gardens. Walter’s Viburnum can grow in full sun to part shade and flowers best in moist to wet acidic soils rich in organic content. Alongside U.S. 19 fronting the Ag-Pro Store, Walter’s Viburnum makes a compact shrub beneath the Florida state tree, Sabal Palm, Sabal palmetto.

The staff at Ag-Pro on U.S. 19 in Crystal River told Jane the landscaping fronting the building was three years old. This Walter’s Viburnum is likely ‘Mrs. Schiller’s Delight.’ It has a dense twiggy crown, tiny leaves and remains compact beside the handrail of the entry steps. It takes pruning well if desired, but has reached its mature size in full sun and with regular irrigation and fertilization.

Named varieties like this ‘Mrs. Schiller’s Delight’ Walter’s Viburnum have large, dense clusters of tiny white flowers at the ends of twigs. It flowers in spring before new light-green leaves emerge. The pollen attracts insects but there is nectar only for small species of butterflies and moths that may have emerged by late winter. The shrub offers shelter and hiding places for small wildlife like lizards, anoles, songbirds and insects.

Walter’s Viburnum ‘Densa’ used as part of a privacy screen and wildlife buffer zone blocks the view of the neighbor’s home across the street and the dust from the county-maintained limestone road. During winter, the evergreen shrubs block the wind. The bench in full sun is an ideal spot to rest, contemplate and read during the cooler months. These shrubs pictured were four years in the ground and grew 5 to 6 feet high with a similar diameter by 2021. ‘Densa’ blooms both spring and fall.

As the Chinese spirea, Spirea cantoniensis, in Jane’s garden has arching branch to 8 to 10 feet tall, it is planted near Encore Azaleas that max out at 5 feet tall by 5 feet in diameter. The Encores are repeat bloomers that flower for more than six months in Jane’s garden. The contrast of the white spirea and the colorful Encore azaleas is a delight during the spirea’s March to April flowering season.

In spring after the viburnums flowered and start setting fruit, next the spirea blooms and fades then the Philadelphus shrubs burst into flower. Dubbed mock orange because of their citrus-like fragrance, Philadelphus coronarius flowers from the tail end of March and through April in Central Florida. A series of carefully chosen flowering plants can keep something in flower every day of the year in Central Florida.

The native, red-flowered Coral Honeysuckle, Lonicera sempervirens, twines and scrambles up the Philadelphus canes using them as a prop to gain height and access to more sunlight. Most flowering plants bloom better with more sunlight. During Florida’s torrid hot summers, the sun can burn plant leaves, so some plants need afternoon shade. Planting winter and spring flowering shrubs beneath existing native deciduous trees like Turkey Oak, Quercus laevis; Sugarberry, Celtis laevigata; and Black Cherry, Prunus serotina, lets weaker winter sunshine in and creates afternoon shade after the trees leaf out for the summer. Coral Honeysuckle will scramble to the top of a Turkey Oak and attract Ruby-throated Hummingbirds as they return to Central Florida in March.

Philadelphus Mock Orange has four white petals and yellow pollen on the central cluster of stamens. This introduced non-native shrub can reach more than 10 feet tall. Stems arch gracefully under the weight of the flowers in April. Prune immediately after its flowering season ends to shorten the tall, cane-like stems, induce branching at the leaf nodes and subsequently more flowers next spring.

1 of 11

At Dunnellon Public Library, this Walter’s Viburnum, Viburnum obovatum, is a selected named variety called ‘Densa.’ It was planted about seven years ago and pruned to prevent it from growing to its maximum height of about 5 feet tall.

The small flowering tree with white spring flowers is a native semi-deciduous Walter’s Viburnum. It grows alongside Citrus Avenue at low elevation a few miles north of Crystal River. The roadside is lined with natural native trees and shrubs including Sabal Palm, Sabal palmetto, Florida’s state tree, Longleaf Pines, Pinus palustris, and deciduous Turkey Oak, Quercus laevis. Walter’s Viburnum ranges on the temperate Southeastern Coastal Plain from Alabama through Georgia and into South Carolina in U.S. cold hardiness zones 6 to 9. It is slow growing, with a lifespan of about 50 years.

This white flowering Walter’s Viburnum grows on the west side of Citrus Avenue north of Crystal River. It flowers for about three weeks in early March. Native, natural Walter’s Viburnum is a semi-deciduous shrub to small tree that grows to 30 feet tall in the wild. Its habitats include coastal hammocks, limestone outcrops, floodplains, woods and riverbanks. It ranges throughout Florida and may be evergreen in the south but is deciduous where winters have frosts and freezes.

Named varieties of Walter’s Viburnum remain compact, dense and much shorter than the original species, so are popular in commercial landscapes and home gardens. Walter’s Viburnum can grow in full sun to part shade and flowers best in moist to wet acidic soils rich in organic content. Alongside U.S. 19 fronting the Ag-Pro Store, Walter’s Viburnum makes a compact shrub beneath the Florida state tree, Sabal Palm, Sabal palmetto.

The staff at Ag-Pro on U.S. 19 in Crystal River told Jane the landscaping fronting the building was three years old. This Walter’s Viburnum is likely ‘Mrs. Schiller’s Delight.’ It has a dense twiggy crown, tiny leaves and remains compact beside the handrail of the entry steps. It takes pruning well if desired, but has reached its mature size in full sun and with regular irrigation and fertilization.

Named varieties like this ‘Mrs. Schiller’s Delight’ Walter’s Viburnum have large, dense clusters of tiny white flowers at the ends of twigs. It flowers in spring before new light-green leaves emerge. The pollen attracts insects but there is nectar only for small species of butterflies and moths that may have emerged by late winter. The shrub offers shelter and hiding places for small wildlife like lizards, anoles, songbirds and insects.

Walter’s Viburnum ‘Densa’ used as part of a privacy screen and wildlife buffer zone blocks the view of the neighbor’s home across the street and the dust from the county-maintained limestone road. During winter, the evergreen shrubs block the wind. The bench in full sun is an ideal spot to rest, contemplate and read during the cooler months. These shrubs pictured were four years in the ground and grew 5 to 6 feet high with a similar diameter by 2021. ‘Densa’ blooms both spring and fall.

As the Chinese spirea, Spirea cantoniensis, in Jane’s garden has arching branch to 8 to 10 feet tall, it is planted near Encore Azaleas that max out at 5 feet tall by 5 feet in diameter. The Encores are repeat bloomers that flower for more than six months in Jane’s garden. The contrast of the white spirea and the colorful Encore azaleas is a delight during the spirea’s March to April flowering season.

In spring after the viburnums flowered and start setting fruit, next the spirea blooms and fades then the Philadelphus shrubs burst into flower. Dubbed mock orange because of their citrus-like fragrance, Philadelphus coronarius flowers from the tail end of March and through April in Central Florida. A series of carefully chosen flowering plants can keep something in flower every day of the year in Central Florida.

The native, red-flowered Coral Honeysuckle, Lonicera sempervirens, twines and scrambles up the Philadelphus canes using them as a prop to gain height and access to more sunlight. Most flowering plants bloom better with more sunlight. During Florida’s torrid hot summers, the sun can burn plant leaves, so some plants need afternoon shade. Planting winter and spring flowering shrubs beneath existing native deciduous trees like Turkey Oak, Quercus laevis; Sugarberry, Celtis laevigata; and Black Cherry, Prunus serotina, lets weaker winter sunshine in and creates afternoon shade after the trees leaf out for the summer. Coral Honeysuckle will scramble to the top of a Turkey Oak and attract Ruby-throated Hummingbirds as they return to Central Florida in March.

Philadelphus Mock Orange has four white petals and yellow pollen on the central cluster of stamens. This introduced non-native shrub can reach more than 10 feet tall. Stems arch gracefully under the weight of the flowers in April. Prune immediately after its flowering season ends to shorten the tall, cane-like stems, induce branching at the leaf nodes and subsequently more flowers next spring.

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