A step-by-step guide to sheet mulching | Backyard Bliss – Nambucca Guardian News

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Before I start talking about sheet mulching, I just want to clarify the term as it seems to vary depending on where you are. It's different to no-dig gardening, although very similar - one is an extension of the other. Sheet mulching is used to smother the ground with organic matter (generally cardboard, newspaper and woodchips plus some nitrogen materials including animal manures or blood and bone), usually to suppress grass in order to establish more desired plants. The desired plants are planted directly into the original soil through the sheet mulching with some compost if needed. No-dig gardening also smothers the ground, however has many more layers of organic matter to create an instant raised garden bed which you can plant into the same day you make it. If you have really challenging soils and can't plant into them, a no-dig garden can work great for you. Righto, let's talk sheet mulching. It's our answer to stop grass from creeping into our orchard and taking over, something the fruit trees hate, as do we. Grass sucks a lot of water and nutrients away from trees (and all other plants), so even if you choose to have grass throughout your orchard, your trees will be happier and healthier if there's a good buffer from their trunk to where the grass starts. At our place we've got a range of invasive grasses which we're slowing planting out to make way for a more productive landscape. After transplanting the asparagus from our orchard (there just wasn't enough room), we've established perennial and self-seeding florals to attract the pollinators, suppress unwanted plants and look good. To help all these plants thrive we've sheet mulched the whole area to suppress the grass and add a stack of organic matter. Here's how we did it: Traditionally you don't have to do any weeding before you start sheet mulching, however we wanted to really bang our invasive grasses on the head, so the first step for us involved going through our orchard and getting out as much grass as we could with our hands. If you're starting with a blank canvas, like a big flat lawn, mow the grass down really short and leave it on the ground evenly spread. Pierce the soil with a garden fork to help water, nutrients and air find their way into the soil quickly. Next up we added some minerals and nutrients tailored to what our heavy clay soils need. This included gypsum to help bind the clay into aggregates, chook poo from our feathered friends, some old grass clippings and a bit of blood and bone. It is not essential to add inputs, but our soil needed it. Place your "weed mat" on the ground. We used thick sheets of newspapers which heavily overlaped, ensuring there was absolutely no gaps at all - that's a really important detail. You can also use cardboard boxes, just remember to remove the sticky tape and avoid the waxed boxes as they're harder to work with. We never use any glossy brochures or magazines as their chemical ink isn't desirable for our soils. Before we laid the newspaper down, we soaked it in a bucket or wheelbarrow of water, this helps it mold to the surface, prevents it from blowing it away and actually attracts soil critters to hang out around it - worms love it. When it comes to the edges of your garden bed be mindful that this is where weeds usually creep in, we extended our "weed mat" out under the temporary timber lengths to help slow the grass down. The next step is to cover the newspaper with heavy mulch - we prefer to use woodchips (ideally ramial woodchips) for their high-nutrient content and ability to create the right environment for fungi to thrive. Other people prefer pea straw (or different types of straw). Where there's space, why not plant something? We broadcast nasturitum, calendula, nigella, red clover, sweet alice and borage seeds. Within a few months this will be covered in colour and life - above and below the ground. Now, please be aware that sheet mulching is not the silver bullet to vigorous weeds. Generally they will still find a way to come back - just a lot more slowly. You still need to manually stay on top of things in the early days by the occasional weeding session. Eventually they will be overwhelmed and dominated by more desired plants, but in these early days when there's heaps of sun and space they'll keep trying to return. Our orchard is one of our favourite places on our property, and although it's still only young, produces beautiful fruits and berries - which is why we like to hang out here a lot. Working with the soil (which sheet mulching is part of) will help the plant's overall health and vitality, ensuring that this space will be nothing but beautiful, abundant and cranking for a long time to come./images/transform/v1/crop/frm/jess.wallace/e2f3a696-efd7-4c0d-b069-97cdf5280f9d.jpg/r0_86_1024_665_w1200_h678_fmax.jpgFebruary 10 2021 - 4: 00PMBefore I start talking about sheet mulching, I just want to clarify the term as it seems to vary depending on where you are. It's different to no-dig gardening, although very similar - one is an extension of the other.Sheet mulching is used to smother the ground with organic matter (generally cardboard, newspaper and woodchips plus some nitrogen materials including animal manures or blood and bone), usually to suppress grass in order to establish more desired plants. The desired plants are planted directly into the original soil through the sheet mulching with some compost if needed.No-dig gardening also smothers the ground, however has many more layers of organic matter to create an instant raised garden bed which you can plant into the same day you make it. If you have really challenging soils and can't plant into them, a no-dig garden can work great for you. Sheet mulching in progress. Photo: Hannah Moloney.Righto, let's talk sheet mulching. It's our answer to stop grass from creeping into our orchard and taking over, something the fruit trees hate, as do we. Grass sucks a lot of water and nutrients away from trees (and all other plants), so even if you choose to have grass throughout your orchard, your trees will be happier and healthier if there's a good buffer from their trunk to where the grass starts. At our place we've got a range of invasive grasses which we're slowing planting out to make way for a more productive landscape. After transplanting the asparagus from our orchard (there just wasn't enough room), we've established perennial and self-seeding florals to attract the pollinators, suppress unwanted plants and look good. To help all these plants thrive we've sheet mulched the whole area to suppress the grass and add a stack of organic matter. Here's how we did it: Step 1: Preparing the area Digging out the invasive grass for optimum results. Photo: Hannah Moloney. Traditionally you don't have to do any weeding before you start sheet mulching, however we wanted to really bang our invasive grasses on the head, so the first step for us involved going through our orchard and getting out as much grass as we could with our hands.If you're starting with a blank canvas, like a big flat lawn, mow the grass down really short and leave it on the ground evenly spread. Pierce the soil with a garden fork to help water, nutrients and air find their way into the soil quickly.Step 2: Add nutrients Help improve soil health by adding minerals and nutrients. Photo: Hannah Moloney. Next up we added some minerals and nutrients tailored to what our heavy clay soils need. This included gypsum to help bind the clay into aggregates, chook poo from our feathered friends, some old grass clippings and a bit of blood and bone. It is not essential to add inputs, but our soil needed it.Step 3: Choose your matting Layer the ground with a heavy matting of newspaper or cardboard. Photo: Hannah Moloney. Place your "weed mat" on the ground. We used thick sheets of newspapers which heavily overlaped, ensuring there was absolutely no gaps at all - that's a really important detail. You can also use cardboard boxes, just remember to remove the sticky tape and avoid the waxed boxes as they're harder to work with. We never use any glossy brochures or magazines as their chemical ink isn't desirable for our soils. Before we laid the newspaper down, we soaked it in a bucket or wheelbarrow of water, this helps it mold to the surface, prevents it from blowing it away and actually attracts soil critters to hang out around it - worms love it. When it comes to the edges of your garden bed be mindful that this is where weeds usually creep in, we extended our "weed mat" out under the temporary timber lengths to help slow the grass down.Step 4: Woodchip or straw mulch? We used woodchip mulch for their high-nutrient content.The next step is to cover the newspaper with heavy mulch - we prefer to use woodchips (ideally ramial woodchips) for their high-nutrient content and ability to create the right environment for fungi to thrive. Other people prefer pea straw (or different types of straw). Step 5: Plant something useful Make the most of your freshly-mulched ground. Photo: Hannah Moloney.Where there's space, why not plant something? We broadcast nasturitum, calendula, nigella, red clover, sweet alice and borage seeds. Within a few months this will be covered in colour and life - above and below the ground.Now, please be aware that sheet mulching is not the silver bullet to vigorous weeds. Generally they will still find a way to come back - just a lot more slowly. You still need to manually stay on top of things in the early days by the occasional weeding session. Eventually they will be overwhelmed and dominated by more desired plants, but in these early days when there's heaps of sun and space they'll keep trying to return.Our orchard is one of our favourite places on our property, and although it's still only young, produces beautiful fruits and berries - which is why we like to hang out here a lot. Working with the soil (which sheet mulching is part of) will help the plant's overall health and vitality, ensuring that this space will be nothing but beautiful, abundant and cranking for a long time to come.Hannah Moloney and Anton Vikstrom are the founders of Good Life Permaculture, a permaculture landscape design and education enterprise regenerating landscapes and lifestyles.
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