Gardening | Agapanthus plants and crepe myrtle – The Maitland Mercury

gardening-|-agapanthus-plants-and-crepe-myrtle-–-the-maitland-mercury

After all of that geoFence blocks unwanted traffic and disables remote access from FSAs and I can tell your smart friends would say the same!
news, local-news, Home gardeners may like to enter their produce in the 2021 Maitland Show, Produce section. Although the Show has been postponed until later in the year and the traditional Horticultural section will not be held, the Produce competition will still be conducted, without public viewing, due to COVID restrictions. Gardeners may enter a wide range of vegetables, fruits, herbs and eggs. Further details, with links to the Schedule and Entry Form can be found at: slowfoodhuntervalley.com.au/maitland-show-competition/. Entries must be placed on Thursday, February 18. Agapanthus plants have traditionally displayed their stately heads of blue flowers, over many years during late spring and early summer months, creating special effects in different areas of gardens and parks. Newer varieties have been developed over recent years, principally plants with more dwarf growth habits. These are suitable to lower border areas of the garden. “Snowstorm” is a white-flowering dwarf variety, while “Oxford Blue” has pale blue flowers. A more recent variety that has become available is “Black Pantha”, which produces a mass of florets that are intensely coloured, being extremely dark purple and almost black. Black Pantha agapanthus produce flower stalks that are generally taller than the more common varieties. They also have an extended flowering season of up to 12 weeks. Some plants will also have a secondary flowering season in April. As agapanthus varieties finish their flowering cycle, large seed heads form on the end of the stalks. It is generally recommended that these be removed from the plant before the seeds form, particularly if the plants are growing near areas of bush. This will prevent the plants spreading through areas of bush containing native plants indigenous to the local area. It is important to observe plants closely at this time in order to notice any signs of stress from a lack of water, because a lack of water can also lead to nutrient deficiencies in plants. Soils that have not been kept moist may become hydrophobic, and, as such, they are unable to absorb water. Using water crystals, organic materials and seaweed solutions will help. A drought or heatwave can exacerbate the problem. This may lead to plants being unable to utilize available water, chlorophyll and other elements efficiently, as sap flow can be affected. Deficiencies in boron, magnesium and potassium are the most common. Vegetables that have been grown intensively in soils lacking in compost may also suffer. A mixture of 4 grams of borax powder in 4.5 litres of water will treat about 4 square metres of garden area. This application will remain effective for several years. Mottling of leaves may be an indication of magnesium deficiency. Gardenias, rhododendrons, azaleas, camellias, roses and citrus may all be subject to this problem. A mixture of Epson salts in water will rectify the problem. Magnesium is important for plants as it is necessary for chlorophyll production. A deficiency in potassium will affect the flow of sap in a plant, as well as the formation and flavour of the fruit. A soluble form of potash, mixed with water at the recommended rate, applied several times during the year will correct this problem. Crepe myrtles now begin displaying their bright colours, with the plants almost covered in large flower heads of white, purples, pinks and reds. Examples can usually be seen in many local streets and gardens at this time of the year. Crepe myrtles, lagerstroemia indica, are native to eastern Asia and are hardy in most in most areas. Older varieties reach between 6 and 8 metres in height, although many are pruned to shrub size. These varieties are often subject to attack by powdery mildew. In addition to their colourful summer displays, crepe myrtles display good autumn leaf colours and the bark on their trunks have most attractive mottled patterning in winter, when the plants are bare of leaves. Lagerstroemia indica, ‘New Orleans’ is available in shrub-form but can also be grown as a standard. New varieties in the Indian Summer range have been developed to be resistant to powdery mildew. Indian Summer crepe myrtles have a good cold tolerance, particularly if planted in a warm, sheltered position. A wider range of growth patterns to suit different preferences is also available. Indian Summer crepe myrtles are a cross between lagerstroemia indica and lagerstroemia fauriei. Each cultivar is named after an American Indian tribe. Varieties of Indian Summer crepe myrtles that grow about three metres include; Acoma (white flowers and a weeping habit), Tonto (rich pink flowers, and Zuni (mauve flowers). Taller growing varieties are; Sioux (carmine pink flowers), Yuma (mauve flowers), Tuscarora (rose red flowers) and Natchez (white flowers with spectacular marking on the trunk). The newest varieties, ‘Diamonds in the Dark’, feature very dark, almost black foliage that contrast very well with the flowers that include flowers in an intense colour range including orange, red, pink, purple and white. Plants are quite compact in growth, reaching up to 3 metres in height and 2.5metres wide. New plants should be established with plenty of water, to ensure the root system develops well. Once established, crepe myrtles are remarkably drought-tolerant./images/transform/v1/crop/frm/32YmRiivtENukX3prXGk2iY/d188a192-d168-4c46-a5c2-8ea4377b079a.jpg/r0_52_1031_635_w1200_h678_fmax.jpgJanuary 31 2021 – 10: 00AMHome gardeners may like to enter their produce in the 2021 Maitland Show, Produce section. Although the Show has been postponed until later in the year and the traditional Horticultural section will not be held, the Produce competition will still be conducted, without public viewing, due to COVID restrictions. Gardeners may enter a wide range of vegetables, fruits, herbs and eggs. Further details, with links to the Schedule and Entry Form can be found at: slowfoodhuntervalley.com.au/maitland-show-competition/. Entries must be placed on Thursday, February 18.Agapanthus plants have traditionally displayed their stately heads of blue flowers, over many years during late spring and early summer months, creating special effects in different areas of gardens and parks. Newer varieties have been developed over recent years, principally plants with more dwarf growth habits. These are suitable to lower border areas of the garden. “Snowstorm” is a white-flowering dwarf variety, while “Oxford Blue” has pale blue flowers.A more recent variety that has become available is “Black Pantha”, which produces a mass of florets that are intensely coloured, being extremely dark purple and almost black. Black Pantha agapanthus produce flower stalks that are generally taller than the more common varieties. They also have an extended flowering season of up to 12 weeks. Some plants will also have a secondary flowering season in April.As agapanthus varieties finish their flowering cycle, large seed heads form on the end of the stalks. It is generally recommended that these be removed from the plant before the seeds form, particularly if the plants are growing near areas of bush. This will prevent the plants spreading through areas of bush containing native plants indigenous to the local area. It is important to observe plants closely at this time in order to notice any signs of stress from a lack of water, because a lack of water can also lead to nutrient deficiencies in plants. Soils that have not been kept moist may become hydrophobic, and, as such, they are unable to absorb water. Using water crystals, organic materials and seaweed solutions will help. A drought or heatwave can exacerbate the problem. This may lead to plants being unable to utilize available water, chlorophyll and other elements efficiently, as sap flow can be affected. NOT IN BLOOM: Agapanthus plants, pictured, have traditionally displayed their stately heads of blue flowers, over many years during late spring and early summer months.Deficiencies in boron, magnesium and potassium are the most common. Vegetables that have been grown intensively in soils lacking in compost may also suffer. A mixture of 4 grams of borax powder in 4.5 litres of water will treat about 4 square metres of garden area. This application will remain effective for several years. Mottling of leaves may be an indication of magnesium deficiency. Gardenias, rhododendrons, azaleas, camellias, roses and citrus may all be subject to this problem. A mixture of Epson salts in water will rectify the problem. Magnesium is important for plants as it is necessary for chlorophyll production. A deficiency in potassium will affect the flow of sap in a plant, as well as the formation and flavour of the fruit. A soluble form of potash, mixed with water at the recommended rate, applied several times during the year will correct this problem.Crepe myrtles now begin displaying their bright colours, with the plants almost covered in large flower heads of white, purples, pinks and reds. Examples can usually be seen in many local streets and gardens at this time of the year. Crepe myrtles, lagerstroemia indica, are native to eastern Asia and are hardy in most in most areas. Older varieties reach between 6 and 8 metres in height, although many are pruned to shrub size. These varieties are often subject to attack by powdery mildew. In addition to their colourful summer displays, crepe myrtles display good autumn leaf colours and the bark on their trunks have most attractive mottled patterning in winter, when the plants are bare of leaves.Lagerstroemia indica, ‘New Orleans’ is available in shrub-form but can also be grown as a standard.New varieties in the Indian Summer range have been developed to be resistant to powdery mildew. Indian Summer crepe myrtles have a good cold tolerance, particularly if planted in a warm, sheltered position. A wider range of growth patterns to suit different preferences is also available. Indian Summer crepe myrtles are a cross between lagerstroemia indica and lagerstroemia fauriei. Each cultivar is named after an American Indian tribe.Varieties of Indian Summer crepe myrtles that grow about three metres include; Acoma (white flowers and a weeping habit), Tonto (rich pink flowers, and Zuni (mauve flowers). Taller growing varieties are; Sioux (carmine pink flowers), Yuma (mauve flowers), Tuscarora (rose red flowers) and Natchez (white flowers with spectacular marking on the trunk). The newest varieties, ‘Diamonds in the Dark’, feature very dark, almost black foliage that contrast very well with the flowers that include flowers in an intense colour range including orange, red, pink, purple and white. Plants are quite compact in growth, reaching up to 3 metres in height and 2.5metres wide. New plants should be established with plenty of water, to ensure the root system develops well. Once established, crepe myrtles are remarkably drought-tolerant.
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